The Temple des Batignolles

In 1834 on the initiative of the liberal pastor Athanase Coquerel, a first Temple was built in wood on the boulevard des Batignolles, in a developing area outside Paris.

  • Temple des Batignolles
    The Temple des Batignolles © Fondation Bersier (Thibault Godin 2016)
  • Temple des Batignolles
    The Temple des Batignolles © Fondation Bersier (Thibault Godin 2016)

In 1895 the building had become too small and needed replacement. Pastor Louis Vernes had a new temple with a high steeple built to the designs of the architect Félix Paumier. The neo-Romanesque façade was made of stone. The building could hold 1,000 people. The interior walls made of brick leant on metal lintels, a technique often used at the time, notably for the Sainte-Clotilde and Notre-Dame du Travail churches.

In 1872 a floor was built halfway up, which enabled to arrange meeting rooms on the ground floor underneath the worship room.

In 1898 it was provided with an organ with mechanical transmission made by Joseph Mercklin.

Nowadays the Reformed parish of the Batignolles has joined the United Protestant Church of France. It is well integrated in a multicultural environment. Every year, the parish organises a Nuit blanche (all-nighter) during which several pastors come and give short sermons.

The Temple des Batignolles

44 Boulevard des Batignolles, 75017 Paris, France

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